Igoumenitsa to Paxi Ferry

The Igoumenitsa Paxi ferry route connects Greece with Ionian Islands. Currently there is just the 1 ferry company operating this ferry service, Kerkyra Lines. The crossing operates up to 7 times each week with sailing durations from around 1 hour 30 minutes.

Igoumenitsa Paxi sailing durations and frequency may vary from season to season so we’d advise doing a live check to get the most up to date information.

Igoumenitsa - Paxi Ferry Operators

  • Kerkyra Lines
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 1 hr 30 min
    • Get price

Igoumenitsa Guide

The Greek city of Igoumenitsa is located in the north west of Greece and is the capital of the Thesprotia region. The Greek island of Corfu lies a short distance across the Gulf of Igoumenitsa and is therefore a popular place to visit from the town. Igoumenista is surrounded by hills full of pine trees and is on an amazing coastal road lined with sycamores. The town's port is an important line between Greece and Italy and as a result attracts many tourists to its streets which are lined with beautiful buildings containing shops, cafes and restaurants. A pleasant way to spend a relaxing afternoon as by taking a slow lunch on the terrace in one of the city's restaurants.

The city was once an important town in the Kingdom of Thesprotis in the 4th century and was known as Titani. Following archaeological excavations, artefacts have been found showing there was a theatre and two temples in the town.

From the town's port ferries can be taken to Bari, Brindisi, Ravenna, Trieste, Venice, Kerkyra, Lefkimi and Paxi.

Paxi Guide

Paxi is an island of Greece, in the Ionian Sea. In Greek mythology Poseidon created the island by striking Corfu with his trident, so that he and wife Amphitrite could have some peace and quiet.
Although possibly inhabited from prehistoric times, the Phoenecians are traditionally held to have been the first settlers on Paxi. The name is believed to be derived from Pax which meant slate in their language.
The Romans ruled the island from the 2nd century BC, and during the Byzantine period and Middle ages it was constantly attacked by pirates. After various rulers and Crusaders had passed through, the island was taken by the Venetians at the end of the 14th century.
During the Napoleonic wars the Ionian Islands were taken by the French, a Russo-Turkish alliance, and finally by the British, who established the Ionian Union in 1815. In 1864, together with the rest of the Heptanese, Paxi was ceded to the Greek state.