Thessaloniki to Syros Ferry

The Thessaloniki Syros ferry route connects Greece with Cyclades Islands. Currently there is just the 1 ferry company operating this ferry service, Hellenic Seaways. The crossing operates up to 1 times each week with sailing durations from around 29 hours 10 minutes.

Thessaloniki Syros sailing durations and frequency may vary from season to season so we’d advise doing a live check to get the most up to date information.

Thessaloniki - Syros Ferry Operators

  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 29 hr 10 min
    • Get price

Thessaloniki Syros Average Prices

Prices shown represent the average one way price paid by our customers. The most common booking on the Thessaloniki Syros route is a car and 3 passengers.

Thessaloniki Guide

The second largest city in Greece is Thessaloniki which is also the capital of the Macedonian region of the country. The city lies on the northern edge of the Thermaic Gulf and is bounded by Mount Chortiatis to the south east and the Gulf to its east. The city was founded by Cassander of Mecedon in 315 BC and went on to become an important city during Roman times when it became the second largest and richest city in the Byzantine Empire. The city was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in recognition of the many Byzantine monuments in the city which includes the Paleochristian and Byzantine monuments of Thessaloniki. Also in the city are a number of Roman, Ottoman and Sephardic Jewish monuments. Thessaloniki is regarded as the cultural capital of Greece and has many theatres and arts venues. The city's main theatres, run by the National Theatre of Northern Greece which was established in 1961, include the Theatre of the Society of Macedonian Studies, where the National Theatre is based, the Royal Theatre (Vasiliko Theatro), Moni Lazariston, and the Earth Theatre and Forest Theatre, both amphitheatrical open-air theatres overlooking the city.

Ferry services from the city's port depart to Varthi via Lemnos, Mitilini and Chios and then on to Kavala. Passenger facilities in the port include waiting rooms, cafes, information desks and public telephones.

Syros Guide

The Greek island of Syros is one of the Cyclades group of islands and is unusual in that the island's architecture is more medieval rather than the more typical Cycladic. The island's capital is Ermoupolis and has some fine examples of Venetian mansions to see. In the Vaporia quarter of the capital visitors will find some lovely large churches and impressive neoclassical buildings, such as the Town Hall and Apollo Theatre in the central square. Also popular with visitors are the island's beaches which are well equipped for tourists and have a good range of facilities.

The island can trace its history back to the 3rd millennium BC where signs of inhabitation have been found in the Halandriani and Kastri parts of the island. Artefacts found indicate that there was some kind of metal workshop on the island which possibly had a trading relationship with Asia Minor. The Samians occupied the island in the 6th century BC and is when many of the island's inhabitants moved to the island. At that time, the important physician and philosopher Pherecydis was born in Syros and some years later he went to Samos and became the teacher of Pythagoras.